Jim Crow

In 1936, an African-American mailman created a travel guide specifically designed to help African Americans on the road know where they could go and safe as well as be treated with dignity.

Rep. Jeffries dissected the history of Africans in America and the Black experience in the United States.

The 1936 Olympics were well-documented and known for the success of track and field gold medalist Jesse Owens. A new documentary titled Olympic Pride, American Prejudice shares the experiences of the other 17 African-American athletes “who defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler to win hearts and medals at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin.”   The film’s […]

If this sign spotted at Cleveland's Quicken Loans Arena is any indication, things are going to get ugly at the RNC.

From the 1880s into the 1960s, a majority of American states enforced segregation through “Jim Crow” laws (so called after a black character in minstrel shows). From Delaware to California, and from North Dakota to Texas, many states (and cities, too) could impose legal punishments on people for consorting with members of another race. The […]

NY Congressman Hakeem Jeffries recently sat down with Roland Martin, host of NewsOne Now, to discuss his proposed bill to give released prisoners who have…

Aviva Kempner, director of the new documentary "Rosenwald," discuss the movie and Julian Bond's involvement in the film.

A special election investigation by Al Jazeera America and journalist Greg Palast uncovered a series of Republican lead anti-voter fraud actions that may be targeting…

Few crimes raise the ire in African-Americans more than the outlawed practice of lynching. Used primarily as a tool of justice and to incite fear…

Former Ward 2 Councilman and Chokwe Lumumba, 65, is the new mayor of  Jackson, Miss., winning the general election with 87 percent of the vote,…

The opening night speaker at the Tea Party convention suggested a return to a “literacy test” to protect America from presidents like Obama — a segregation-era method employed by southern US states to keep blacks from voting.