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U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-Illinois) continued courting Silicon Valley voters with another "town hall' style meeting with Google employees in the Mountain View company's cafe Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2007. (Patrick Tehan/Mercury News)

Source: MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images / Getty

In 2008 if you were black and living in America you knew that you had a chance to make history and change the scope of the greatest country in the world by voting for Barack Obama.  There are no historical facts that minority voters come out simply to change history but the statistics of voter turn out to the polls for the 2008 presidential election seem to support that theory.

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According to an analysis by the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University, votes by blacks ages 18-29 years old increased by 8.7% landing at a 58.2% turn out in comparison to 2004 where only 49.5% of young minority voters came to the pools. Overall eligible black voter turnout also increased to 65.2% in 2008 almost matching white eligible voters at 66.1%

Black women had the highest voter turnout rate making this the first time in history. The U.S. largest minority groups, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians, also clocked in record-breaking numbers at the polls for the 2008 presidential election.  On November 4, 2008 all of these things came together to form a record-breaking day resulting in the election of the first African-American President beating Senator John McCain.

In 2009 President Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.  President Obama was elected to a second term in 2012 standing for all Americans throughout his eight years in the White House.   His legacy leaves behind inclusivity for the LGBTQ community, strictly gun laws, marriage equality, the capturing of terrorist Osama Bin Ladin and much more.

 

 

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How Minority Voters Changed America in 2008  was originally published on hotspotatl.com

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